Adaptive Fashion

Let’s talk about Adaptive Fashion?! How many of you` feel it is important for adaptive fashion to be inclusive? How many of you wear Adaptive fashion?

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I know it is a big deal for caregivers & people living with dementia (PLWD) once they get to a stage where they have difficulty with one of the big activities of daily living (or ADLs as they are sometimes called) & lose the skills to dress themselves (we’ll call this mid stage dementia). Adaptive clothing can help PLWD stay independent in dressing themselves longer AND it’s also easier for caregivers (aka carers in the UK or care partners) both family/amateur/unpaid & paid professionals to see to the dressing & fashion needs of the people who live with dementia (Alzheimers is but 1 type).

I have dealt with a company in Brooklyn (whose name escapes me at the moment) that makes or imports adaptive clothing but it can be dowdy. I know plenty of people who don’t have cognitive issues who don’t like the few easily available options out there, and the younger they are, the less appealing much of standard adaptive fashion appeals to them.

This will be a growth industry as people age & as more people have serious chronic health issues to live with.

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Yes I totally agree with you. I just want everyone to be Inclusive and I don’t want to be left out. Adaptive fashion is the new trend wooohoooo

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Extremely! I’m so glad to see that more “fashionable” adaptive clothing is creeping into light, although my only complaint is that it can be so expensive! (although I do understand that many places producing adaptive clothing are independent so I can understand why!)

I get so excited when I find something “accidentally adaptive” in high street stores; paper bag waist jeans for example, they have a highly elasticated waist which doesn’t cause pain and makes it easier to get them on and off! (although this won’t be suitable for everyone, it’s just something I’ve been lucky enough to find helpful!)

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hahahaha right! it’s soo true!!! I get excited too when I come across adaptive fashion, especially I am excited I came across adaptive swimwear. Miga swimwear. have you heard of them?

Oooh I haven’t, I’ll check them out!

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Hey there new to This whole Thing. I’m also newly disabled but before I became disabled I worked professionally as a model and I also worked in the fashion industry. Right before Covid hit I was asked to be in ambassador for our local fashion week and represent are disabled community. when I was Instagram and I brought a target and used their tag. Somebody in our community happen to be watching and I was talking about how I couldn’t find any sensory tools. Through that led me to getting a conversation with one of their team members who works on their accessibility line. I know I have the great privilege of having input on some of their new accessibility lines coming out. They’re mostly starting with children’s clothing but they’re working into women’s. There’s also some great lines out. There’s also some great lines out Tommy Hilfiger has a full line of accessibility clothing! Also check out aria! Being disabled doesn’t mean you don’t care about the clothing on your back. It just means it takes you a little bit longer. And you usually wear your clothes a little bit longer.

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Hello Chelsea, welcome to the community, and thank you for the response. It’s so true and I am hearing more about these stories each and every day regarding the adaptive fashion. I definitely am looking to do create adaptive clothing collection soon. I just started following you on instagram from @girlschronically_rock

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Yes!! I wrote a blog entry Fashionably Comfortable on the “fashion” prowess of a thermo-sensitive, fatigued, MS patient with variable mobility issues depending the day.

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oh wow this is awesome!! thank you for sharing this!

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